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5 health 'facts' that are actually myths

(BPT) - Get eight hours of sleep at night, eat your vegetables, and an apple a day keeps the doctor away - these are all common health sayings you've heard and probably believe to be true. While commonly told health myths may have some truth to them, there are some that don't hold up to further examination.

1.) Starve a cold and feed a fever. This one has been told for years, though most people can't remember which one you starve and which you feed. However, according to WebMD, the best advice is to starve neither. You'll recover from the flu or a cold more quickly with a healthy, balanced diet, so eat sensibly and you'll be yourself again in no time.

2.) Small and soft toothbrushes make for an ineffective clean. This one isn't true. The American Dental Association actually recommends using a small brush head with soft bristles. Using a brush like Oral-B's new Compact Clean provides a small brush head that can get to those hard-to-reach places and provide a precise clean. Because of its unique ultra-dense feathered bristles which offer multiple cleaning tips per filament, Compact Clean will also gently remove plaque in a comfortable, effective way. 'As a hygienist, one of the biggest obstacles my patients face is finding the balance between using a brush that is soft enough and achieving an effective clean,' says Andrew Johnston, RDH. 'Compact Clean's design allows you to remove plaque while keeping your teeth and gums safe against toothbrush abrasion.'

3.) Cold weather increases your chance of catching a cold. It seems to make sense, but it's not true. There is no proof colder temperatures increase your chances of catching a cold, according to LiveScience.com. Instead, research shows the spike in colds during the winter months is actually due to people spending more time indoors, around one another, making it easier for the cold to spread from one person to the next.

4.) Reading in poor lighting is bad for your eyes. While it certainly makes it more difficult to focus on what you're reading, there is no evidence that reading under such conditions will cause any permanent structural or long-term damage to your eyes according to WebMD.

5.) An aerobic workout will significantly boost your metabolism all day long. Nope, but you will enjoy a nice boost while you're actually doing the workout along with a small boost throughout the day, though only about 20 extra calories according to WebMD. If you want improved all day benefits, strength training is actually the better way to go because it conditions your body to burn calories more efficiently.

So the next time you're tempted to starve your cold, or only read a book with lights blazing, remember that these five commonly held health myths are now debunked! To learn more about how Compact Clean can lead to powerful results, visit www.oralb.com.


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